Category Archives: Plains

Dense Fog over Kansas

Dense Fog Advisory issued by Goodland Kansas on 19 August 2019 (Click to enlarge)

Dense Fog developed over portions of the central Plains on Monday morning, 19 August 2019; The Goodland Kansas office of the National Weather Service issued Dense Fog Advisories for part of their County Warning Area, as shown above.  A variety of satellite-based products are useful for monitoring dense for from satellite.  The one used for the longest time is the so-called Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference field, shown below, that detects (in blue/cyan, in the default AWIPS color enhancement used) clouds that contain water droplets.  Small water droplets do not emit 3.9 µm radiation as a blackbody would, but they do emit 10.3 µm radiation as a blackbody.  Thus the brightness temperature that is computed by detecting via satellite the amount of radiation emitted and converting those numbers of photons to an emitting temperature (a conversion that does assume blackbody emission!) will be warmer for 10.3 µm radiation than for at 3.9 µm radiation.  An animation of that field is shown below.

GOES-16 ABI ‘Night Fog’ brightness temperature difference field (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), 1026 – 1421 UTC on 19 August 2019 (Click to animate)

Note in the animation above that dense fog over the higher Plains or western Kansas and Nebraska is well-articulated by this field; dense fog over Iowa and eastern Nebraska is not depicted with clarity. The animation also shows a well-known feature of the Night Fog Brightness Temperature difference field — it loses a signal during sunrise as the amount of reflected 3.9 µm radiation increases.

GOES-R IFR Probability fields, below for the same time, better capture the horizontal extent of low ceilings and reduced visibilities (i.e., IFR conditions) in this case by marrying the brightness temperature difference field with low-level saturation as predicted by the Rapid Refresh model. If satellite detection suggests clouds are present — or likely — and low-level saturation is predicted by the model, then IFR Probabilities will be large. The animation below highlights the IFR conditions over western Nebraska and Kansas — but it also highlight IFR conditions in eastern Nebraska and western Iowa, regions that the Night Fog brightness temperature difference does not capture dramatically. Note that during the animation, IFR probability fields can change quickly — as updated Rapid Refresh data (that is, a more recent model run that is often more accurate) are incorporated into the algorithm.

GOES-R IFR Probabilities, 1026 – 1431 UTC on 19 August 2019 (Click to enlarge)

Because the Night Fog brightness temperature difference does not outline fog features well in eastern Nebraska and Iowa, the Nighttime microphysics Red/Green/Blue composite, that uses the Night Fog Brightness temperature difference as its green component (Night Time Microphysics Quick Guide), similarly does not outline them, unlike IFR Probability. Be alert to the strengths and weaknesses of the product used for detecting fog.

Night time Microphysics RGB, Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference, and GOES-16 IFR Probabililty, all at 1026 UTC on 19 August 2019 (Click to enlarge)

Fog and Low Stratus under cirrus

Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), 0801-1311 UTC on 7 May 2019 (Click to animate)

Consider the animation above, of the Brightness Temperature Difference product (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) centered on Colorado on the morning of Tuesday 7 May 2019. The surface observations show widespread IFR conditions, but because of widespread high clouds over the region, the brightness temperature difference shows little signal that is consistent with low clouds (blue or cyan in this enhancement). There isn’t much horizontal spatial correlation between observations of low ceilings/reduced visibility and the Brightness Temperature Difference product. When low clouds are overlain by high clouds, don’t expect a satellite detection of low clouds to work. Note also how the Brightness Temperature Difference field loses its signal as the sun rises and a general increase in the amount of reflected solar shortwave (3.9 µm) infrared radiation increases.

GOES-R IFR Probability includes near-surface information that is useful, especially when mid-level or high clouds obscure the satellite view of low clouds. Rapid Refresh estimates of near-surface saturation are used to gauge the probability of IFR conditions. In the case on 7 May 2019, that information allowed GOES-R IFR Probability to approximate exactly where the lowest ceilings and more reduced visibilities were. There is therefore a much better spatial correlation between the location of surface observations showing IFR conditions, and the IFR Probability field. This has a tacit implication on how well the Rapid Refresh Model is simulating the evolution of the atmosphere. Note also that in contrast to the Brightness Temperature Difference field, a consistent signal is maintained through sunrise.

GOES-R IFR Probability, and surface observations of ceilings/visibility, 0801-1311 UTC on 7 May 2019 (Click to animate)

Because the NightTime Microphysics RGB relies on the Night Fog Brightness Temperature difference field, it rises or falls on fog detection on the shoulders of the Brightness Temperature Difference field. On this day, it fell. Click here for the Nighttime Microphysics RGB animation; the animation below toggles between the three fields — Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference, Nighttime Microphysics RGB, and IFR Probability — at 1002 UTC on 7 May 2019.

Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), Nighttime Microphysics RGB and GOES-R IFR Probability fields, 1001 UTC on 7 May 2019 (Click to enlarge)

Cloud Layers and Detection of IFR Conditions

GOES-16 Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), Nighttime Microphysics RGB and GOES-16 IFR Probability at 1116 UTC on 22 February 2019; Surface observations of ceilings and visibilities at 1100 UTC are also plotted (Click to enlarge).

A strong storm embedded within a subtropical jet stream over the southern United States was associated with widespread fog on the morning of 22 February 2019. This screen-capture from this site shows Dense Fog Advisories over much of Georgia, and over regions near Dallas. Which products allowed an accurate depiction of the low ceilings and reduced visibilities?

The toggle above cycles between the Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), which product identifies low clouds (cyan blue in the default AWIPS enhancement shown) because of differences in emissivity at 3.9 µm and 10.3 µm from small water droplets that make up stratus clouds, the Nighttime Microphysics RGB, which RGB uses the Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference as it green component, and the GOES-16 IFR Probability product.  IFR conditions are defined as surface visibilities between 1 and 3 miles, and ceiling heights between 500 and 1000 feet above ground level.  The plotted observations help define where that is occurring.  Multiple cloud layers from Arkansas east-northeastward make a satellite-only detection of IFR conditions challenging.  IFR Probability gives useful information below cloud decks because model-based saturation information from the Rapid Refresh Model fill in regions below multiple cloud decks where satellite information about low clouds is unavailable.

The toggle below shows the same three satellite-based fields (Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference, Nighttime Microphysics RGB and IFR Probability)  at the same time, but centered over Oklahoma.  In this case, the Rapid Refresh Data are used to screen out a region of elevated stratus over northeast Oklahoma. Note that these is little in the Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference field to distinguish between the IFR and non-IFR locations.

GOES-16 Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), Nighttime Microphysics RGB and GOES-16 IFR Probability at 1116 UTC on 22 February 2019; Surface observations of ceilings and visibilities at 1100 UTC are also plotted (Click to enlarge).

GOES-R IFR Probability over the southeast United States in this case is identifying regions of IFR conditions underneath multiple cloud decks (and also where only the low clouds are present) by incorporating low-level saturation information from the Rapid Refresh model. Over Oklahoma, non-IFR conditions under an elevated stratus deck are identified (and screened out in IFR Probability fields) by the lack of low-level saturation information in the Rapid Refresh.

Fog over the central United States

Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) and Nighttime Microphysics RGB at 0507 UTC on 1 February 2019, and surface observations of ceilings and visibilities (Click to enlarge)

The toggle above displays the Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference field (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) and the Night Time Microphysics Red/Green/Blue (RGB) Product that uses the Night Fog Brightness Temprature Difference field as its green value. In the color enhancements above, cyan in the Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference denotes positive values that occur because stratus clouds — that is, clouds that are made up of water droplets — do not emit 3.9 µm radiation as a blackbody. Consequently, the computation of brightness temperature (which assumes blackbody emission) results in a 3.9 µm brightness temperature that is cooler than at 10.3 µm (clouds are emitting 10.3 µm radiation very nearly like a blackbody).  Low clouds in the RGB that may or may not support IFR conditions range in color from light cyan (over Texas and Florida) to more orange and yellow (yellow over the Great Lakes were exceptionally cold air is in place).

The fields above are overpredicting where fog/low ceilings might be occurring because cloud top measurements from the Brightness Temperature Difference do not always give reliable guidance on cloud base.

By merging satellite information about clouds and cloud type with Rapid Refresh model information at about low-level saturation, GOES-R IFR Probability fields screen out regions where IFR conditions are unlikely;  the map suggests low ceilings and fog are most likely over Texas and Oklahoma.  The zoomed in image, below shows that IFR conditions are indeed occurring in this region.  Other regions with a strong signal in the Brightness Temperature Difference field — Tennessee, for example — show low IFR Probability and surface observations that do not show IFR conditions.

GOES-R IFR Probability field, 0507 UTC on 1 February, along with surface reports of ceilings and visibility (Click to enlarge)

GOES-R IFR Probability field, 0507 UTC on 1 February, along with surface reports of ceilings and visibility zoomed in over the southern Plains (Click to enlarge)

Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) and Nighttime Microphysics RGB at 1007 UTC on 1 February 2019, and surface observations of ceilings and visibilities (Click to enlarge)

The same relationships occur at 1007 UTC; the Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference and Nighttime Microphysics RGB overpredict the regions of low clouds/fog; IFR Probability’s use of Rapid Refresh Data allows it to screen out regions where fog is not present, but stratus clouds are, and also add in regions where cirrus clouds prevent the detection of low clouds, but Rapid Refresh data suggests low-level saturation is present (such as over the Gulf of Mexico south of Louisiana).

The IFR Probability field is accurately outlining the region of IFR conditions.

GOES-R IFR Probability field, 1007 UTC on 1 February, along with surface reports of ceilings and visibility (Click to enlarge)

GOES-R IFR Probability field, 1007 UTC on 1 February, along with surface reports of ceilings and visibility zoomed in over the southern Plains (Click to enlarge)

Fog over Kansas

GOES-16 IFR Probability fields, 0557 – 1157 UTC on 21 May 2018 (Click to animate)

Dense Fog Advisories were issued over Kansas by the Goodland KS Forecast Office on Monday 21 May 2018. The IFR Probability field, above, computed using GOES-16 and Rapid Refresh Model output shows the development of fog as it developed westward across Kansas. (Surface winds in the region were light (source); Plot 2 (from here)).

High clouds around Kansas impeded the detection of low stratus/fog from satellite in some regions.  Those regions benefit from the fused data methods of IFR Probability:  where satellite data alone cannot be used, model data can give important information.  Consider the ‘Night Fog’ Brightness Temperature Difference field, below (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) for the same period as shown above.  High clouds are apparent over southeast Kansas and Missouri, and also occasionally over Nebraska.  High clouds over McCook, Nebraska, just north of the Kansas-Nebraska state line in southwest Nebraska, prevent the satellite detection of fog even as the ceilings and visibilities decrease. (Here is a toggle of the three products at 1002 UTC).

Similarly, IFR or near IFR conditions develop over southwestern Missouri, but a cirrus shield there means that Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) fields, and the Nighttime Microphysics RGB (that relies on the Brightness Temperature Difference field) cannot observe the low clouds.

GOES-16 ‘Night Fog’ Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), 0557 – 1157 UTC on 21 May 2018 (Click to animate)

GOES-16 Nighttime Microphysics RGB, 0557 – 1157 UTC on 21 May 2018 (Click to animate)

When you use a product to ascertain the presence of fog/low stratus, be certain that you understand its limitations.

IFR Conditions with a Spring storm over the central United States

GOES-16 IFR Probability fields, every 10 minutes, from 0202 through 1412 UTC on 19 March 2018 (Click to animate)

Dense Fog Advisories (click here for graphical image from this site) and widespread IFR Conditions (click here for graphical image from this site) occurred as a nearly-occluded system spun slowly eastward across the central part of the United States on 19 March 2018. (Surface; 500-hPa). GOES-16 IFR Probability, shown above, (Click the image to see the animation) outlines two large areas where consistent IFR conditions develop/persist: the upper Plains, in states around Nebraska, and the Deep South.

The GOES-16 Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference field (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), animation shown below, historically has been used to identify low stratus that is assumed to be fog at night. That detection suffers when high clouds are present (consistently on the morning of 19 March over Nebraska and surrounding states; occasionally over the Deep South as convection expels high-level cirrus into the atmosphere). Because IFR Probability fuses satellite data with Numerical Model estimates of low-level saturation (from the Rapid Refresh Model), it retains a strong signal of fog in regions where multiple clouds layers prevent the satellite from observing observed low stratus causing IFR conditions, such as over Nebraska, or over Mississippi at 0607 UTC.

GOES-16 Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), 0202-1412 UTC on 19 March 2018 (Click to animate)

Note that there exists a Brightness Temperature Difference signal over the High Plains of Texas and New Mexico at, for example, 0800-0900 UTC. (See below). Persistent drought exists in that region (linked image from this site) and the dryness can alter the relative emissivities of the soils so that a signal develops (Click here for an earlier example).  There are no clouds in this region;  the Rapid Refresh model shows very dry air and the IFR Probability algorithm correctly diagnoses very small probabilities of IFR conditions.

GOES-16 Night Fog Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), 0802-0902 on 19 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Dense Fog Advisories over the Plains

Dense Fog Advisories were issued over parts of the central and northern Plains states on Friday January 5. For example, from the North Platte Office (similar warnings were issued by Billings, Rapid City and Bismark offices):

URGENT – WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service North Platte NE
634 AM CST Fri Jan 5 2018

…Areas of dense fog likely this morning…

.Areas of fog reducing visibilities below one quarter mile at
times will be likely from parts of southwest into the central
Nebraska Sandhills this morning. With the fog occurring where
temperatures are below freezing, some slick spots may develop on
area roads and sidewalks as well.

NEZ025-026-037-038-059-071-051800-
/O.NEW.KLBF.FG.Y.0001.180105T1234Z-180105T1800Z/
Thomas-Blaine-Logan-Custer-Lincoln-Frontier-
Including the cities of Thedford, Halsey, Dunning, Purdum,
Brewster, Stapleton, Broken Bow, North Platte, Curtis, Eustis,
and Maywood
634 AM CST Fri Jan 5 2018

…DENSE FOG ADVISORY IN EFFECT UNTIL NOON CST TODAY…

The National Weather Service in North Platte has issued a Dense
Fog Advisory, which is in effect until noon CST today.

* Visibilities…as low as one quarter mile or less at times.

* Timing…Through the morning hours with visibilities improving
after noon CST.

* Impacts…Hazardous driving conditions due to low visibility.
Fog may freeze on area roads and walkways as well.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

A Dense Fog Advisory means visibilities will frequently be
reduced to less than one quarter mile. If driving, slow down, use
your headlights, and leave plenty of distance ahead of you.

&&

$$

JWS

GOES-16 IFR Probability fields captured the development of these regions of dense fog. The animation from 0400-1200 UTC on 5 January is below. Highest values of IFR Probability are consistent in the areas where IFR Conditions are developing and where Dense Fog Advisories were issued.

GOES-16 IFR Probability, 0402 – 1207 UTC on 5 January 2018 (Click to animate)

Note that IFR Probability fields are fairly high over Iowa and the eastern Dakotas, regions where mid-level stratus was widespread but where IFR observations did not occur. On this day, Low IFR Probability fields better screened out this region of mid-level stratus. The toggle below compares IFR Probability and Low IFR Probability on 0957 UTC. The region where dense fog advisories were issued shows high values in both fields. The stratus deck over Iowa and the eastern Dakotas shows much smaller values of Low IFR Probability.

GOES-16 also has a ‘Fog Product’ brightness temperature difference (10.3 – 3.9) that has historically been used to detect low clouds. However, when cirrus clouds are present, as on 5 January, the efficacy of this product in fog detection is affected. Although fog and stratus detection is identifiable underneath the moving cirrus (the same is true in the Advanced NightTime Microphysics RGB product below), identifying the low cloud as stratus or fog from satellite data is a challenge because a consistent color married to IFR Probability does not exist.

GOES-16 ‘Fog Product’ Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), 0402 – 1207 UTC, 5 January 2017 (Click to animate)

GOES-16 Advanced Nighttime Microphysics RGB, 0402-1207 UTC on 5 January 2018 (Click to animate)

GOES-16 IFR Probability fields maintain a consistent look from night to day. Both the (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) Brightness Temperature Difference field and the Advanced Nighttime Microphysics RGB (that uses the ‘Fog Product’ BTD) will change because the increase in reflected solar radiation at 3.9 µm will change the sign of the Brightness Temperature Difference field. There is a Daytime Day/Snow/Fog RGB Product in AWIPS, and the toggle below from 1612 UTC on 5 January compares IFR Probability and the Day/Snow/Fog RGB. As with the nighttime products, the presence of high (or mid-level) clouds makes it difficult to use the RGB alone to identify regions of fog/low stratus. In contrast, the IFR Probability field continues to correctly identify where the obstructions to visibility exist.

Dense Fog over Missouri and over Alabama

GOES-R IFR Probability Fields, Hourly from 0215-1315 UTC on 19 September 2017 (Click to enlarge)

GOES-R IFR Probabilities are computed using Legacy GOES (GOES-13 and GOES-15) and Rapid Refresh model information; GOES-16 data will be incorporated into the IFR Probability algorithm in late 2017

Dense fog developed over Missouri on Tuesday 19 September and Dense Fog Advisories were issued. The animation above shows the hourly development of GOES-R IFR Probability fields; values increased from northern Missouri to southern Missouri as dense fog developed, first north of I-70, then south into the rest of the state. The morning of 19 September was mostly devoid of mid-level and high-level clouds over Missouri (exception: west-central Missouri starting after 0900 UTC), and that kind of night means that traditional methods of fog detection work well. The brightness temperature difference field between the shortwave Infrared and the Longwave Infrared (3.9 µm and 10.3 µm on GOES-16, 3.9 µm and 10.7 µm on GOES-13) shows the fog development.

Note that the IFR Probability field, above, does not show fog dissipating around sunrise. That’s in contrast to the Brightness Temperature Difference field below. As the sun rises, the amount of solar radiation at 3.9 µm that is reflected off the clouds increases; this changes the brightness temperature difference from positive (cyan in the color enhancement shown) to negative (grey or black in the enhancement shown).

GOES-16 has better spatial resolution than GOES-13; thus, the small valley fogs that can develop in the rugged (ish) terrain of southern Missouri are resolved in GOES-16, but not in GOES-13. When GOES-R IFR Probability is created using GOES-16 data (slated to begin in late 2017), the resolution improvements in GOES-16 will migrate to IFR Probability fields.

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing.

GOES-16 Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), hourly from 0412 to 1112 UTC on 19 September (Click to enlarge)


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On 20 September, Dense Fog developed over Tennessee and Alabama, leading to the issuance of Dense Fog Advisories. The GOES-R IFR Probability field, below, shows good agreement between high probabilities and reduced ceilings/visibilities.

GOES-R IFR Probability Fields, Hourly from 0415-1315 UTC on 20 September 2017 (Click to enlarge)

As on the 19th over Missouri, top, this was a night with relatively few middle- and upper-level cloud decks. On such nights, the GOES-16 Brightness Temperature Difference field can capably identify regions of stratus (it’s up to a human to decide if the stratus deck extends to the surface; on this night, much of the stratus did). The 2-hour animation of Brightness Temperature Difference, below, highlights two particular strengths of GOES-16: Better spatial resolution that allows small valleys to be sampled correctly, and good temporal resolution (every 5 minutes vs. every 15 minutes for GOES-13) that allows superior monitoring of the cloud evolution with time. Note that the rising sun is eroding the GOES-16 Brightness Temperature Difference signal by the end of the animation below.

GOES-16 Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), hourly from 1002 to 1202 UTC on 20 September (Click to enlarge)

The Brightness Temperature Difference field (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) is a key component to the Nighttime Microphysics Red/Green/Blue Composite. As the toggle below shows, the Brightness Temperature Difference field overwhelmingly controls the region identified by the RGB as one with a potential for fog.

Dense Fog over the central Mississippi River Valley

GOES-16 Brightness Temperature Difference field (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) from 0417 to 1357 UTC on 28 August 2017 (Click to animate)

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing.

GOES-16 Brightness Temperature Difference fields (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm), above, show the development of stratus clouds (made up of water droplets) over the Plains during the morning of 28 August 2017.  The Brightness Temperature for 10.3 µm is warmer than that for 3.9 µm during the night because cloud water droplets do not emit 3.9 µm radiation as a blackbody but those same cloud water droplets do emit 10.3 µm radiation more nearly as a blackbody would.   The conversion from sensed radiation to brightness temperature does assume blackbody emissions;  thus, the 3.9 µm brightness temperature is cooler where clouds made up of small water droplets exist.  The animation above shows stratus clouds developing over Missouri and adjacent states.  Dense Fog Advisories were issued near sunrise for much of the region (see image at bottom of this blog post) and IFR Conditions were widespread.

The animation above shows a positive signal over the western High Plains from Kansas northward to North Dakota. (Click here for the view at 1132 UTC on 28 August).

GOES-R IFR Probabilities are computed using Legacy GOES (GOES-13 and GOES-15) and Rapid Refresh model information; GOES-16 data will be incorporated into the IFR Probability algorithm in late 2017

How did GOES-R IFR Probability fields capture this event? The animation showing the fields every 30 minutes from 0215 through 1345 UTC on 28 August 2017, below, shows the development of High Probabilities in the region where Dense Fog was observed. There is a signal along the western High Plains, but it has low Probability; a conclusion might be that thin stratus has developed but that the Rapid Refresh model does not suggest that widespread low-level saturation is occurring. As the sun rises, the signal over the western High Plains disappears. Click here for a toggle between the GOES-R IFR Probability and the GOES-16 Brightness Temperature Difference field at 1115 UTC.

GOES-R IFR Probability fields, 0215-1345 UTC, 28 August 2017 (Click to enlarge)

Screen Capture of http://www.weather.gov at 1300 UTC on 28 August 2017 (Click to enlarge)

Dense Fog over the Texas High Plains

GOES-R IFR Probability fields, hourly from 0215-1115 UTC on 2 August 2017 (Click to enlarge)

GOES-R IFR Probabilities are computed using Legacy GOES (GOES-13 and GOES-15) and Rapid Refresh model information; GOES-16 data will be incorporated into the IFR Probability algorithm in late 2017

The National Weather Service in Lubbock issued Dense Fog Advisories (below) for parts of their CWA early in the morning on 2 August 2017.  GOES-R IFR Probability fields, above, show a slow increase in values over west Texas during the night of 1-2 August 2017, as visibilities drop and ceilings lower in the region.  This followed a band of showers that moved through the area around sunset on 1 August (Click here for a visible image from 0017 UTC on 2 August, from this site).  Highest IFR Probability values at the end of the animation generally overlay the Dense Fog Advisory.  As a situational awareness tool for the developing fog/low stratus, IFR Probability performed well.

 

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

GOES-16 Brightness Temperature Difference field (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) at 1117 UTC on 2 August 2017 (Click to enlarge)

The GOES-R IFR Probability fields above mostly show the small-scale variability (i.e., pixelation) that is common when both (legacy) GOES data and Rapid Refresh Data are used to produce a probability that IFR conditions will be present.  Some exceptions:  southeastern New Mexico at the end of animation (1115 UTC);  the yellow and orange region there overlain by mid-level or high clouds that prevent a satellite view of the low clouds.  The GOES-16 Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) field at 1117 UTC shows a signal of high clouds there (cyan / blue / purple enhancement showing negative values that typify thin cirrus in the Brightness Temperature Difference field at night).  The Green values in the color enhancement are positive values and correspond to stratus (composed of water droplets) clouds.  Because the Brightness Temperature Difference field shows a signal, the Advanced Nighttime Microphysics RGB will also have a signal for fog (the whitish/cyan color), as shown below.

GOES-16’s better temporal and spatial resolution allow for more accurate monitoring of the development of small-scale features.  However, the shortcomings of using a Brightness Temperature Difference from satellite to monitor fog development should not be forgotten:  In regions of cirrus, satellite views of low stratus and fog are blocked.  In addition, over Texas and the rest of the High Plains, upslope flow can generate stratus over the central Plains that becomes fog over the High Plains as the terrain rises into the clouds.  The top of the stratus cloud and the fog bank in such a case can look very similar from satellite.

Advanced Microphysics RGB Composite at 1117 UTC on 2 August 2017 (Click to enlarge)

Below is a toggle between the 1115 UTC IFR Probability field, the GOES16 Brightness Temperature Difference Field, and the GOES16 Advanced Microphysics RGB Composite.

GOES-R IFR Probability fields computed with legacy GOES data and Rapid Refresh model output, GOES-16 Brightness Temperature Difference (10.3 µm – 3.9 µm) field and GOES-16 Advanced Microphysics RGB, all near 1115 UTC on 2 August 2017 (Click to enlarge)